A Dassault Falcon 50 – N114TD, operated by Air American Flight Services, attempted to land on the Greenville Downtown Airport’s (GMU) Runway 19 on September 27, 2018 and was unable to stop on the runway’s asphalt surface. After landing the jet overran the runway and continued down a 50-foot embankment. The airplane came to rest with the nose severed from the rest of the airplane.

According to a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) report neither of the two pilots flying the Falcon 50 were qualified to operate in the position they were working. The acting pilot in command on the flight held only a second in command type rating for the airplane. The first officer only had a private pilot license with no instrument rating. The Initial report states the airplane may have been operated under Part 135 as a charter flight. The two pilots died in the crash and two of the passengers were critically injured.


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NTSB investigators found the flaps and slats were extended and both left and right spoilers were extended. The report notes that the anti-skid switch had an inoperative placard next to it. The number two and three engine fire handles were pulled and the parking brake was found off.

First responders to the accident reported that all three engines were operating for at least 20 minutes after the accident, with one of the engines running for about 40 minutes after the accident. Local aircraft mechanics at the scene were able to eventually shut down the one remaining engine. There were no reported fires from the accident.

The airplane’s flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder have been retrieved and sent to NTSB headquarters in Washington, D.C. The NTSB has said the factual report might require 12-18 months to complete and release to the public.

About Greg Thomson

Greg started his professional pilot journey in 2002 after graduating from Embry Riddle. Since that time he has accumulated over 7,000 hours working as a pilot. Greg’s professional experience includes flight instructing, animal tracking, backcountry flying, forest firefighting, passenger charter, part 135 cargo, and flying for a regional airline. Greg took a 5 year hiatus from flying and worked in software development and marketing. He has since returned to flying as a cargo pilot. Greg enjoys educating and helping pilots improve their professional lives and is passionate about applying technology and new methods to help with traditional challenges.